Clerk’d: Nothing New in the Quick Stop

Clips: Clerks (1994, Kevin Smith) Annie Hall (1977, Woody Allen) Bringing Up Baby (1938, Howard Hawks) Dr. Strangelove (1964, Stanley Kubrick) Duck Soup (1933, Leo McCarey) Pulp Fiction (1994, Quentin Tarantino) Sherlock Jr. (1924, Buster Keaton) Works Cited: Bonila, Paul…

Clerk'd: Nothing New in the Quick Stop

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Clips:

Clerks (1994, Kevin Smith)
Annie Hall (1977, Woody Allen)
Bringing Up Baby (1938, Howard Hawks)
Dr. Strangelove (1964, Stanley Kubrick)
Duck Soup (1933, Leo McCarey)
Pulp Fiction (1994, Quentin Tarantino)
Sherlock Jr. (1924, Buster Keaton)

Works Cited:

Bonila, Paul C. “Is there more to Hollywood lowbrow than meets the eye?.” Quarterly Review of Film and Video 22.1 (2005): 17-24.

Eaton, Mark. “Dark Comedy from Dr. Strangelove to the Dude.” A Companion to Film Comedy. Ed. Andrew Horton and Joanna E. Rapf. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012. 317-39. Print.

Lent, Tina Olsin. “Romantic Love and Friendship: The Redefinition of Gender Relations in Screwball Comedy.” Classical Hollywood Comedy. Ed. Henry Jenkins and Kristine Brunovska Karnick. New York: Routledge, 1995. 314-332. Print.

McDonald, Tamar Jeffers. “The Radical Romantic Comedy.” Romantic Comedy: Boy Meets Girl Meets Genre. New York: Columbia UP, 2007. Print.

Paul, William. “The rise and fall of animal comedy.” The Velvet Light Trap 26 (1990): 73-86.

Music:

“Clerks” by Love Among Freaks
“Shooting Star” by Golden Smog
“Got Me Wrong” by Alice in Chains
Making Me Sick” by Bash & Pop
From the Clerks soundtrack

Fair use:

This video makes fair use of copyrighted material for multiple reasons. Almost all the material used, with the exception of the background music, is included specifically for critical purposes, whether in analyzing the main subject (Clerks) or referring to other works for comparison, contrast or other purposes. The material is presented in such a heavily re-edited form that it couldn’t plausibly be said to constitute an attempt to fulfill an audience’s desire to simply see the original material.

A few films other than Clerks are drawn upon for illustrations and examples of certain points. These samples are only as long as is necessary, and feature no sound — they’re strictly illustrations for the arguments of the video, and are not presented in such a way as to entertain the audience the way the original works would have.

While the use of the other material – namely, the background music taken from the Clerks soundtrack album – isn’t precisely covered by the six principles of online fair use named in the Code of Best Practices, the fact that they’re played only in fragments, mostly at a low volume and generally spoken over by the video’s narration. Therefore, while the purpose of their inclusion is technically aesthetic as opposed to strictly critical, actual fair use law and its application in practice would likely find nothing wrong with its use, and considering that these songs are also in a sense part of the film, they could potentially be considered to fall under the critical justification as well.

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