Voices of Our Kūpuna – HPS Panel, Honolulu 2003

This HPS Panel Discussion featured nā Kumu Hula Puluelo Naipo Park, Nona Beamer, George Naope, Joan Lindsey, and Edith McKinzie. (1:24:02) — Hula Preservation Society “Preserving the Past, Sharing the Future” Web: hulapreservation.org Facebook: facebook.com/HulaPreservationSociety/ Contact: archive@hulapreservation.org Phone: (808) 247-9440…

Voices of Our Kūpuna - HPS Panel, Honolulu 2003

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This HPS Panel Discussion featured nā Kumu Hula Puluelo Naipo Park, Nona Beamer, George Naope, Joan Lindsey, and Edith McKinzie. (1:24:02)


Hula Preservation Society
“Preserving the Past, Sharing the Future”
Web: hulapreservation.org
Facebook: facebook.com/HulaPreservationSociety/
Contact: archive@hulapreservation.org
Phone: (808) 247-9440
Address: PO Box 6274, Kaneohe, HI 96744
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TRANSCRIPT:

“Voices of Our Kūpuna”
PNP: [Pilahi Paki Aloha Chant]

NB: Maikai; maikai.

[APPLAUSE]

GN: Talk. You. Talk, Auntie.

NB: Uncle George says, talk. [CHUCKLE]

PNP: What do you want me to say? [CHUCKLE] I’m Puluelo Park from Na Hula O Puamana in Kailua. I’ve been teaching for fifty-two years this year. [APPLAUSE] And still teaching. I should retire, but … I can’t sit still. And I love music. And I love my haumana very much. So I’ve been … not going home to Waimea. That’s where my home is. I stay here in Honolulu and teach, and my husband has to make the trips down to see me. So [CHUCKLE] how we worked that arrangement is, he had to be uh … the boss. But he says, I’ll let you teach, but you come home. [CHUCKLE] But now we um … I uh, teach in Kainalu School, I’m in-a kupuna there. I teach language to the children, and then after school I teach hula to the children. And then in the evening, I have my adults come. And they let me have the room um, for the night. So that’s my s-story right now.

NB: Maikai.
[APPLAUSE]

NB: Well, I’m very happy to be here, friends. Very happy. It’s kind of awkward, we have to turn around like this. [CHUCKLE] Like that. Yeah. [CHUCKLE] Thank you, thank you. Well, hula has been a part of our lives. My great-grandmother, Isabella Kalili Desha and my grandmother, Helen Desha Beamer, and my mother was born in Hoʻokena from the Kamaka family. And she married my father. They met at Kamehameha School when they were like twelve, thirteen years old. Uh, we lived in Nāpoʻopoʻo when I was little. And then they decided to uproot the whole family; we had to come to Honolulu to English standard school. I don’t know that it was a good trade-off. I kind of felt like uh, I was a country girl all my life. But it’s been a very wonderful life. I was eighty last week. [APPLAUSE] I have been- I haven’t gotten used to seventy yet, so I might be slow getting used to eighty. [CHUCKLE] But it has been a wonderful basis for my life. A lot of it has been sad. I think we all understand that plight of uh, Hawaiians being uh, downtrodden and going to Hawaiian school and not being Hawaiian, and da-da-da-da-da. You know, that whole story. And all of a sudden, coming out into the sunshine. And it’s not us; we’re not the ones doing it. It’s our haumana that are doing it. It’s our sons and daughters, and their manaʻo and their good heart, and their combination of guts and courage. And they’re the ones that have brought this renaissance to the fore. And I praise you.

[APPLAUSE]

GN: Oh, uh, what? Um, my name is George Lanakilakeikiahialii Naope. [APPLAUSE] Uh, I started hula at the age of um, I was three and a half years old. I learned from-uh, my first teacher was aunt-Mama Fuji. M-m, Japanese name, but that was Auntie Edith Kanakaole’s mother. And I learned from her. And then um, Ilalaole, and … Auntie Helen Beamer for the auana. And then Auntie Lokalia Montgomery, um, Puaha-not Pua Haaheo. Uh, Tom Hiona, Auntie Lokalia, and of course, Auntie Iolani Luahine. So I didn’t dance until I was twelve years old. I didn’t think I could dance. I only-I only learned oli and-and uh, you know, things about the hula. And I’m … two years younger than God. [LAUGHTER] And you guess that and when you find out how old God, then you know how old me. [LAUGHTER] And I’m happy-thank you, M-M-Maile, for inviting me again. Mahalo [UNINTELLIGIBLE].

ML: Oh, mahalo.
[APPLAUSE]

JL: Aloha mai. I’m Joan Lindsey, and I-my first kumu hula was aunt, Caroline Tuck. For many years, I tried to find out who she studied under. And uh, maybe a month or so ago, I ran into Alicia Smith. Aloha, Alicia, back there.

[CONTINUED…]

NOTE: To read remainder of transcript, email archive@hulapreservation.org)

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